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#AlexOLoughlin – GQ Australia: Men of the Year (November 2011)

With some new pictures from this GQ photoshoot of 2011 surfacing this week, we realised that we have never added the actual article in our archives. Here it is now, together with some of the  most incredibly sexy pictures ever taken of Alex.
Credits for the sources of the pictures and fanart are on the pictures.
 
Over the years a number of these pictures that were not in the magazine came along and I could not help myself – had to add nearly all of them! After 2 months of nearly nothing from us, we hope you take your time and savour all this beauty and the article with so many things about Alex that we know so well from way back 6 years ago, even before he settled down with his wife and family in Hawaii.. It contains a few of my favourite Alex quotes.

Alex O’Loughlin – Actor of the Year.

How does a battler go from labouring on Canberra’s building sites to living the showbiz dream in Hawaii? Hard work, steely resilience and a very Australian sense of humour.

For GQ Australia
By:  Richard Clune
Photographer: Dusan Reljin
Model: Alicia Hall

The sun’s final dance of the day melts into the horizon as Alex O’Loughlin straddles his surfboard at the back of a gentle Hawaiian break, chatting to a surfer who recognises him from Hawaii Five-0, the TV series that delivered him to the archipelago 18 months ago.

It’s been six years since this high-school dropout from Canberra arrived in the City Of Angels. The only surfing back then was from couch to couch, crashing with mates until an eventual call-up. That initial luck fell flat, with his first two shows cancelled. But then came the reboot of an iconic ’70s staple, an updated boys-own adventure that had O’Loughlin taking the baton from Magnum, P.I. in fighting crime — often shirtless — around Honolulu.

We sit down with O’Loughlin back on dry land — with his shirt firmly on.

GQ: Is it true you once wanted to fly planes?

Alex: Yeah, I was in kindergarten and the teacher asked what we wanted to do when we grew up. I said, “I want to be a fighter pilot.” She stopped in front of my desk and said, “Haven’t you got asthma?”
I said, “Yeah”. She said, “Well, you’ll never be a fighter pilot.”

GQ: Wow, that’s harsh.

Alex: I was crushed. And I never pursued a career in the skies.

GQ: Still, aviation’s loss was acting’s gain. How did you end up going that way?

Alex: I did my first play at primary school. I was about 10; I’ll never forget it. When I walked out under the lights and the audience was paying attention, I just got it. But I didn’t really think it was something I could do.

GQ: Why not?

Alex: I was a working-class kid and I saw acting as a middle-class profession. So I went off and did a lot of other things. I was interested in building, in fact I loved it. I worked on a lot of houses and offices and it was good. It meant I could get my physical thing on and see something emerge. I also worked in hospitality. I once worked for Neil Perry as a barman and a waiter.

Original – @Mymaximus

GQ: So when you decided to try out for NIDA, your main acting experience was from primary school?

Alex: I had no technical skills. I didn’t know what I was doing, but when it felt right it came from an instinct and I think people saw that. And passion. If I ever lose that passion I think I’ll change career.

GQ: Are you ambitious?

Alex: It can be a very ugly word, especially in this business. But I’ve always had a lot of drive. Whether I was working on a building site or auditioning or moving to the US, I’ve always done it with all of my heart. I don’t know how to do it any other way.

GQ: Hawaii Five-0 came on the back of two high-profile cancellations — Moonlight and Three Rivers. Did you fear coming back home a failure? 

Alex: I did — on a couple of levels. Of course, there was the pride level about coming home to my fellow Aussies telling me, “Hey, you thought you were special, didn’t ya?” But much more significantly, I felt that fundamentally I was a failure. That I didn’t have what it took to cut it, that I wasn’t good enough or smart enough. That thought was the most distressing of all. The thought I mightn’t be able to make any sort of living from it was very upsetting.

GQ: How do you feel about working in such a cutthroat business?

Alex: At the end of the day, I’m either an asset or a liability. I’m either making money or I’m not. You can’t take it personally. That’s a mistake a lot of young actors make when they come to Hollywood. They fall into that trap of believing they’re special. Sure, they might be but…

GQ: …they’re probably not. but what about you?

Alex: Look, I don’t think I’m massively talented but I have a clear understanding of how it all works. And I work really hard. I work my arse off.

GQ: Well, it’s certainly paying off. How do you feel about the fame that comes with your level of success?

Alex: I don’t get it. Especially now I’ve had a little taste of it. I’m fascinated by the pathology of someone who wants to be famous — I am so far away from that. It fucking terrifies me. I’m getting anxious just talking about it.

GQ: You’ve said before that you love movies. Do you worry about being pigeonholed as a small-screen player?

Alex: Absolutely. TV scares the shit out of me. With all due respect, it’s a business about numbers and how many people are watching. When you work in the system the way I do at the moment, occasionally you come across material that can seem like you’re going to compromise your integrity as an artist by participating in it. That’s scary because you think, ‘How am I going to make it out of TV alive?’ But there are other things to take into account. I’m 35 years old and I’ve got a 14-year-old son [Saxon, who lives with his mother in Australia].

GQ: What’s he like?

Alex: He’s the best 14-year-old around. I want him to have every opportunity I ever had and the ones I didn’t. I’m grateful for the job — this is me simply [reflecting] about my career and how I feel. I’d never have turned the Five-O job down because it was too good, but you do stop taking risks after a while — when you say, “I need to get some money in the bank and have a solid home for my family.”

Original from @Mymaximus

GQ: If you don’t mind us saying so, you’re looking very buff, good sir. Would you be willing to share your body-shaping tricks?

Alex: For me to work an 80-hour week is not crazy, so it’s all about getting it in when I can. I surf and do jujitsu and try to change it up a lot. 
I really like running, but when I work out, essentially I circuit train, keep my heart rate up and hit it as hard as I can. I just want to stay at that shape and stay strong.

GQ: Fighting beachside crime means you get to show off your  impressive collection of tatts, too.

Alex: Man, tattoos are cool! They’re something that started in the folly of youth and there’s been a progression ever since. I love the outward expression, but there was a period where I was judged, because they weren’t part of popular culture, like they are now. Back then, tattoos meant you’d either been to prison or you were in some sort of gang. I had that conversation with so many girlfriends’ parents, explaining that I wasn’t a felon or a Hells Angel!

Magazine Scan:

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Filed under Alex O´Loughlin, articles, Hawaii Five-0, Interviews, Steve McGarrett

The Upside of being #AlexOLoughlin

The upside of having an ‘O’ name?

“I have far less chance of getting pocket dialed since ‘O’ falls in the middle of the phone book,” says the Hawaii Five-0 star, 35. But since my first name starts with an A, I get pocket dialed anyway.”

– from O’Hotties,

People Magazine

28 November 2011

 

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Filed under Alex O´Loughlin, articles

1826 days of #AlexOLoughlin fun – we are FIVE!

Wow – FIVE years! From then till now, 1926 posts later and sometimes I think we  posted something just the other day or even a few months back, and then when I look for it, it was already posted 2 or 3 years ago. I guess in the end it all blurs into random memories of stories and information and fun with Alex.

There are a lot of fans who have been following Alex’s career for last 10 years or even longer. I can name a few who are just as, or even more, dedicated to following him than in those early days. Your continued love and dedication, says a LOT about him. I have seen a number of you with great passion for him. Many fans and groups have come and gone over the years, but still there are a number of core members whose passion just continue to grow each day. Although we have only been following his career for 6 years, we are proud to regard ourselves as part of those dedicated supporters

To Paula’s amusement I have over the years made a lot of crazy suggestions for stories. Some never made it into posts on here, but some did. Way back in August 2013 just after we celebrated our first year here, we ran a whole Month of Mick. Three years ago, just as we celebrated our two years here, I started a 100 consecutive days of Hawaii Five-0 reviews of every episode since the pilot, just to celebrate the 100th episode.  That meant not only watching each episode again, but analyzing it a bit and doing screencaps for each one. In May 2014 we started posting all the article and interviews of Alex that we could find, and started with one of my favourite articles with him found in the link. Hours and hours of listening to new and old interviews, deciphering what was actually being said and doing transcripts for them followed after we started mad  idea of creating a complete archive of his work. And added to that also the retyping of the magazine scans …… and the job is not done yet, because there are still a few to be done.

Over the years we conducted studies of fun projects starting with Alex’s tattoos in the beginning and moving to his scars, his non-receiding hairline, the changes in his teeth, his non- rhynoplasty, his piercings scars, his favourite T-shirts, etc. Some of these subjects are in desperate need of follow-up posts with new and fresh information.

In the past we have taken a strong stand against reposting of fake pictures of Alex – and I will keep on commenting on them whenever I see them. But on the other hand we advocate the enjoyment of fan art for those who want to add their own touch to any pictures of him. Fake pictures being where Alex’s head is placed on other bodies and then posted as real pictures. And also where the original composition of who and how people feature on group pictures, were altered and then posted as real.

As with many others who use Alex for their art, we ourselves however love to single out Alex’s image in a pictures and use it for art by adding fun to him. Unfortunately it all sometimes seems to be difficult concepts for people to grasp.

Over the years we adjusted and changed with the times to keep things fun and intriguing  – even if it was old stuff that we posted (mainly for ourselves and not necessarily for others as such). For us something is not just what is written or said, but everything is also part of a specific time and place in a period of Alex’s career. And we like to connect the dots and search a bit deeper and give our opinion about it as well.

As with everything in life, the fun here of course also came with some heartache, frustration and disappointment at times – and sometimes that might have spilled over to some of our posts. Some of that frustration stems from people twisting what has actually been said here, to suit their own agenda or view.

As novices, none of it ever came easy for us, because we do not really have the luxury of special sources or the connections in the USA or even Hawaii, that some other site owners might have had in the past. But for us working with each other in the late hours of the night to find some Alex gems, hidden somewhere on the net, became a joy. And along the way we also connected with some friends who support us with kindness by finding some of the rare footage and sharing it with us.

Thank you to those who have supported us during all the years, by enjoying and sharing Alex with us!

We are and will always be proud of this unique little corner and haven of the Alex fandom that we created. Most of it has been done by adding our own touch and point of view to it, but it has always been coloured in by what you, our follow fans, added to it with your comments and ideas and spirit.

Thank you for that!

Our focus stays with Alex and what he offers us with his own work and conduct. Our passion remains to bring you the best and the most accurate information about Alex we can find, with a touch of our own flair. We like to keep it real as far as possible, with the main focus of reporting on Alex’s actual work, enhanced with pictures of his work or other footage we can find.

We are proud to be fans of this extremely kind soul who happens to find himself in an industry of big egos.

 

Here is to another year of Alex fangirling, until our ways should part one day!

Related image

Lots of Alex love,

from Paula and FOYeur!

oxox

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The reason why Steve always drives the car in #H50

“I’m not ready to let him drive it because he’s not responsible. First of all, he can’t drive stick and it’s a stick. So that should be the end of this f—ing thing. But it’s not. He rides the clutch. He grinds the gears. It’s like, if he would just get a little humble and just ask me, I’ll teach him how to drive it. And when he does, I’ll give him the keys back.”

– Alex O’Loughlin about Scott’s driving

TV Guide

October 2013

My Thoughts

  • Sometimes we look for the deeper meaning of things that happen on a show like Hawaii Five-0 and everybody try to analyse it and comment on it. But it might in fact just be something as simple as one actor not thinking the other one is a good enough driver. Nothing really to do with the characters in the beginning, but it just works like that and then it becomes part of the show …..

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Filed under Alex O´Loughlin, articles, Hawaii Five-0, Steve McGarrett

Hawaii is not all fun in the sun ( #H50 article 2010)

Hawaii Five-0 stars Alex O’Loughlin and Scott Caan are polar opposites only on screen – one is a by-the-book cop, the other his loose-cannon subordinate. The two in fact share the same policy of brutal honesty. So honest they are, they make it sound like their participation in a second season of the new hit show might be up in the air

The Straits Times

4 Dec 2010

By Tiffany Fumiko Tay

Two issues are driving their discontentment: long working hours and the direction of the show.

During a mid-day break from filming in Honolulu, the no-nonsense duo quickly quash the perception that being a part of a hit TV show that is located on the sandy shores of a popular holiday destination is anything but dogged work. ‘There’s no time off, so you see people more grinding and grumpy than having a great time,’ says Caan, son of veteran actor James, who plays hot-headed cop Danny ‘Danno’ Williams.

‘Nobody’s doing an hour show and going like ‘This is the greatest thing in the world’. It’s not. Your life is gone when you’re doing a show like this, so the goal is to get through it.’

The pressure of delivering hour-long weekly episodes, working 16 hours a day, six days a week, is beginning to show in the circles under the 34-year-old’s blue eyes. He adds: ‘The no-time-off drives me crazy. That’s my fight if it goes another year, because I need to do the other things I like to do. It’s sort of unhealthy doing this show.’

For a moment, he sounds like his Hawaii Five-0 cynical tough guy persona, who refers to the island at one point as a ‘pineapple-infested hellhole’. Both real and reel men also feel like a fish out of water on the laid-back island and miss the chaos of the city.

But Caan quickly qualifies, saying: ‘Don’t get me wrong, I love the show, but I get asked questions and I don’t know what I’m supposed to do – I’m too honest to bull****. I’m an artist and I’m an unhappy artist most of the time, it’s just how I am.’

Equally unhappy and not afraid to show it is Australian actor O’Loughlin, who plays straight-edged task force leader Steve McGarrett. Like Caan, he is emphatic that Hawaii Five-0 is a tough gig.

‘You move away from your family and friends to a small island where everyone knows your business and the time you’re not at work, you’re at home studying for the next day. Even when the red carpet stuff comes around, you’re so tired you don’t even want to go,’ he says.

The more important bone of contention for him is the development of his character. He would like McGarrett to possess more depth, while, he hints, the producers prefer to adhere to the tried- and-tested money-making method of standard procedurals.

Finding the opportunity to express emotion while staying within the boundaries of the rigid hero is tricky, O’Loughlin, 34, admits. ‘I’m the first one to say please let him kill someone or do something naughty,’ he says.

‘Taking off my sunglasses like this,’ he adds, mimicking David Caruso’s much parodied idiosyncracy in CSI: Miami, ‘is bull****, and I will never do it. Ultimately, what it comes down to for me is character. They’ve tried to take it away, and I’ve been like a baby with a rattle.’

Caan is backing up O’Loughlin, whom critics say he has eclipsed in the show. ‘It’s obviously a nice thing to hear, but people overlook that Alex’s job is a lot harder than mine,’ says the stocky, square-jawed actor.

‘He’s not allowed to have fun. Every time he does something loose, they’re like, no, that’s not McGarrett. So I’ve sort of been set up to be the guy that has fun and makes the show light, and you always win as that guy.

‘I think fewer and fewer people want to see ‘CSI: Hawaii’. They (the producers) should see that this show doesn’t need to be so procedural,’ adds Caan with a tinge of frustration.

In an attempt at damage control, he reiterates that he does not mean to diss the show, and confesses that he struggles with the limitless boundaries of his honesty. And then he makes another all-too-frank announcement.

‘Oh and by the way, I don’t have the cinema career that I want anyway. I don’t get offers to be in movies starring opposite the people I want. This show to me was the best offer I’ve gotten in a really long time. So I’m lucky to have this job. I’m humbled, but I’m not gonna be happy.’

 

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Filed under Alex O´Loughlin, articles, Hawaii Five-0, Interviews